Safe and Economical Solutions for Collecting Explosive Dusts

The cost of preventing industrial dust explosions is necessary but expensive. AAF’s line of wet dust collectors can reduce this cost significantly in comparison with dry dust collectors. G Squared and AAF are highly knowledgeable and experienced in the development of systems for dust explosion mitigation.

Wet dust collectors eliminate the factors that cause dust explosions. AAF® International Wet Dust Collector options include:

  • Type N Roto-Clone® Hydrostatic Precipitator
  • Type N Roto-Clone® Model LV Hydrostatic Precipitator
  • Roto-Clone® DownVent Hydrostatic Precipitator
  • Type W Roto-Clone® Wet Centrifugal Collector
  • Kinpactor® Venturi-Type Dust Collector

G Squared Supplies Dust Explosion Mitigation Needs in the Gulf Coast Region

When you need a solution for dust explosion mitigation, you can rely on G Squared and AAF. The RotoClone and Kinpactor delivers proven performance in a wide range of applications, as well as costs savings.

Advantages G Squared offers you as your Gulf Coast dust explosion mitigation supplier:

  • Strong technical competency in dust collection equipment
  • Knowledgeable and responsive customer service
  • Competitive pricing and deliveries
  • Assistance with system design
  • Installation & set up assistance

Our team offers you the best combination of performance, quality, and value to assure the long-term efficiency and reliability of your process. Contact G Squared to discuss your dust explosion mitigation needs.

Tell Us About Your Project

  • What Causes a Dust Explosion?
  • Dry Dust Collectors Require Interventions
  • Wet Dust Collectors - Protection by Design

In order for a dust explosion to occur, the following five factors must be present:

  1. Fuel – dust particles
  2. Dispersion – a dust cloud of fuel (often produced when a dry filter is pulsed clean)
  3. Oxygen – supplied by the surrounding air
  4. Confinement – the dust cloud is trapped (can be within the dust collector)
  5. Ignition Source – such as a spark generated by friction

 

Note: In addition to NFPA® 484-15, the basic standard for dealing with explosive dust applications is NFPA® 69: Standard on Explosion Prevention Systems. This standard applies to the design, installation, operation, maintenance, and testing of systems for the prevention of explosions by means of various methods. Once again all who are involved with the applications discussed here shall be fully conversant with the provisions of NFPA 69 and shall comply in full with all of its requirements.

The user shall ensure that they are working with the most current edition of the NFPA® standards as well as all governing local authority.

For information on NFPA® standards go to http://www.nfpa.org/

The information herein is non-exhaustive, and users are responsible for becoming familiar with all applicable laws, regulations, rules, and standards.

 

These factors are sometimes referred to as the “explosion pentagon” (adapted from OSHA SHIB 07-31-2005; updated 11-12-2014). The elimination or control of just one of these key factors decreases the risk of a dust explosion dramatically. AAF wet collectors eliminate three of these factors!

A dry dust collector provides the ideal environment for a dust explosion. Fabric media is used to separate the dust from the air. Air passes through the media leaving dust particles embedded on the surface of, and throughout the media. As the air through the media is periodically reversed by a pulse of air, dust is blown off the media, creating a cloud of dust, which eventually falls to a collection hopper. At this point, four of the factors required for a dust explosion are present, creating a dangerous environment. A single spark or hot particle can lead to an explosion.

While many solutions have been devised to decrease the risk of dust explosions in dry dust collectors, they come at a high price and none actually prevent an explosion. Instead, they direct, quench or suppress an explosion after its initiation. Furthermore, many of these solutions cannot ensure that the dust collector will be operable after an explosive episode occurs. Dry dust collector solutions typically involve expensive equipment including:

  • Explosion vents – can be used to relieve the explosive pressure and redirect explosion fire. Dust collectors with explosion vents must be used outside unless the explosion can be vented outdoors. Only if abort dampers or isolation systems are included on the dust collector return duct may air be recirculated.
  • Chemical isolation systems – multiple systems are installed on the dust collector and all connecting air ducts. Upon activation, these systems eliminate oxygen ahead of the developing flame front and quench the fireball. Dust collectors with chemical isolation systems may be installed indoors.
  • Flameless vents – these vents absorb the energy of the vented fireball and allow a dust collector to be installed indoors.
  • Spark detection and spark extinguishing systems – may be required on some types of applications

All of these solutions require that the dust collector be of high-pressure construction to structurally withstand the high internal pressures generated. Along with the additional equipment expense associated with explosion prevention systems, expensive maintenance may be required.

 

Note: In addition to NFPA® 484-15, the basic standard for dealing with explosive dust applications is NFPA® 69: Standard on Explosion Prevention Systems. This standard applies to the design, installation, operation, maintenance, and testing of systems for the prevention of explosions by means of various methods. Once again all who are involved with the applications discussed here shall be fully conversant with the provisions of NFPA 69 and shall comply in full with all of its requirements.

The user shall ensure that they are working with the most current edition of the NFPA® standards as well as all governing local authority.

For information on NFPA® standards go to http://www.nfpa.org/

The information herein is non-exhaustive, and users are responsible for becoming familiar with all applicable laws, regulations, rules, and standards.

By design, a wet dust collector separates dust from an airstream to eliminate several factors that cause dust explosions. Dust laden air enters a wet collector and through a combination of induced aerodynamic and hydrostatic forces. The airborne dust is then wetted and transferred from the air to the water. In terms of explosive dust this accomplishes three things:

  • Transfer of the dust from the air removes it from oxygen exposure, without which combustion cannot occur.
  • Water eliminates any potential source of combustion as well as the need for spark detection and extinguishing systems.
  • Since the eliminated dust is now in a wetted state there is no way for a dispersed dust cloud to form.

 

Note: In addition to NFPA® 484-15, the basic standard for dealing with explosive dust applications is NFPA® 69: Standard on Explosion Prevention Systems. This standard applies to the design, installation, operation, maintenance, and testing of systems for the prevention of explosions by means of various methods. Once again all who are involved with the applications discussed here shall be fully conversant with the provisions of NFPA 69 and shall comply in full with all of its requirements.

The user shall ensure that they are working with the most current edition of the NFPA® standards as well as all governing local authority.

For information on NFPA® standards go to http://www.nfpa.org/

The information herein is non-exhaustive, and users are responsible for becoming familiar with all applicable laws, regulations, rules, and standards.

Wet Dust Collector Combust Dust Solution Savings